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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saggy Aggie View Post
    LOL, I guarantee I’m the only one on this thread that has put my money where my mouth is. I voluntarily chose to live in Katy where we pay 1.5% on top (nearly half of my entire tax rate) directly to the district. That equates to over $5000 a year for me that I’m voluntarily giving to the schools.

    I did that so my son could go to Katy ISD, one of the best districts in the state and by far the best in the Houston area. The athletics and education are better, and so are the teaching salaries coincidently...
    I feel ya. $6,000 in China Spring...

  2. #32
    Administrator/Owner LH Panther Mom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saggy Aggie View Post

    The reality is nowadays teaching is considered a fallback option for tons of students in college. It’s unfortunate and I wish that weren’t the case. Of course that’s not everyone, not even the majority of teachers. But it floods the market, keeping pressure on wages for those who are in it for the right reasons and do a good job.
    And that is a huge problem! Can't cut it in engineering or pre-med or accounting? Switch and become a teacher. The best are the ones that actually want to teach...not those that do it as a fall back.
    Quick side! Strong side! Crank up the Machine!

  3. #33
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    I think the salary is what the market demands. Its not the coach's or AD problem.

    I had a friend that was coach/AD in a small desolate West Texas town almost 30 years ago. While visiting one summer we marveled at his then teaching salary of almost 60 thousand dollars! He laughed and said he loved it...followed by...and they let me teach a class, drive a school bus , and come back to empty the trash.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by LH Panther Mom View Post
    And that is a huge problem! Can't cut it in engineering or pre-med or accounting? Switch and become a teacher. The best are the ones that actually want to teach...not those that do it as a fall back.
    Exactly. And Iím not going to pretend teaching is the only fall back option. Engineering is a fall back option for some students pursuing pre-med and vet degrees for example. The bottom line is that there are absolutely tiers of difficulty in college nowadays

    I recognize this is just one source, but bestcolleges.org says the 3 easiest degrees to obtain nowadays are:

    1) Special education
    2) elementary education
    3) secondary education

    The most difficult are:

    1) biology (pre-med)
    2) comp sci
    3) civil engineering
    4) mechanical engineering

    I wish they would make the teaching degrees and certifications more difficult to come by (i.e GMAT or MCAT). If you raise the bar, it drives down retention rate and improves the quality of candidates and forces higher wages.

    Somewhat surprisingly, I looked up some data that shows around 33% of students change their major in college. I wouldíve expected that to be a little higher

  5. #35
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    This article is such click bait....head football coaches for the most part are on administrator contracts and not teacher contracts.....as TXBroadcaster says their salaries are in line with principals and others in administrative positions in school districts...yes teachers are underpaid but unless we are cutting admin salaries across the board head coaches/AD contracts shouldn't be cut either

  6. #36

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    Cutting AD/head coaching saleries would not increase teacher saleries in my opinion.

  7. #37
    All-American waterboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saggy Aggie View Post
    Exactly. And I’m not going to pretend teaching is the only fall back option. Engineering is a fall back option for some students pursuing pre-med and vet degrees for example. The bottom line is that there are absolutely tiers of difficulty in college nowadays

    I recognize this is just one source, but bestcolleges.org says the 3 easiest degrees to obtain nowadays are:

    1) Special education
    2) elementary education
    3) secondary education

    The most difficult are:

    1) biology (pre-med)
    2) comp sci
    3) civil engineering
    4) mechanical engineering

    I wish they would make the teaching degrees and certifications more difficult to come by (i.e GMAT or MCAT). If you raise the bar, it drives down retention rate and improves the quality of candidates and forces higher wages.

    Somewhat surprisingly, I looked up some data that shows around 33% of students change their major in college. I would’ve expected that to be a little higher
    What about those who are extremely smart, valedictorian and salutatorian in fact, choosing to be a teacher or a registered nurse? Both are making over a 97 average in college, but that is what they have chosen as their careers. Does that mean they are just not smart enough to become doctors or engineers? NO!

    As the spouse of a teacher for 22 years, I can tell you that you really have no clue about the time teachers put in at their jobs. While it may be true for "some" teachers to only work about 9 months out of the year, it is not true for the vast majority of them. I've seen my wife work from 7:15 AM to 10:00 PM five days a week, and then at least 8 hours on Saturdays getting lesson plans together, grading papers, entering grades, etc. That doesn't include the continuing education classes they have to take during the summer. Suffice it to say, she used to work 12 months worth of hours in the "9 months" you're talking about. While her salary is "decent", it wouldn't be worth it for most people. You absolutely have to WANT to do it. Putting up with poor excuses for parents and state mandated testing guidelines, etc. is a whole other thing. The idea of getting rich is definitely not why teachers do what they do. If that were their intent, they definitely chose the wrong career. My wife worked 40 hours a week while working toward her degree. She knows what a "regular" job is for sure. I have nothing but respect for teachers, and yes, I believe they should be paid more. Incentive pay is extremely tough to gauge due to varying student abilities, so I wouldn't know the first "fair" way to make it valid.
    "Whatever It Takes"

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  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by waterboy View Post
    What about those who are extremely smart, valedictorian and salutatorian in fact, choosing to be a teacher or a registered nurse? Both are making over a 97 average in college, but that is what they have chosen as their careers. Does that mean they are just not smart enough to become doctors or engineers? NO!

    As the spouse of a teacher for 22 years, I can tell you that you really have no clue about the time teachers put in at their jobs. While it may be true for "some" teachers to only work about 9 months out of the year, it is not true for the vast majority of them. I've seen my wife work from 7:15 AM to 10:00 PM five days a week, and then at least 8 hours on Saturdays getting lesson plans together, grading papers, entering grades, etc. That doesn't include the continuing education classes they have to take during the summer. Suffice it to say, she used to work 12 months worth of hours in the "9 months" you're talking about. While her salary is "decent", it wouldn't be worth it for most people. You absolutely have to WANT to do it. Putting up with poor excuses for parents and state mandated testing guidelines, etc. is a whole other thing. The idea of getting rich is definitely not why teachers do what they do. If that were their intent, they definitely chose the wrong career. My wife worked 40 hours a week while working toward her degree. She knows what a "regular" job is for sure. I have nothing but respect for teachers, and yes, I believe they should be paid more. Incentive pay is extremely tough to gauge due to varying student abilities, so I wouldn't know the first "fair" way to make it valid.
    I donít think you understood the point of my post.

    Iím not saying all teachers arenít capable of doing other jobs. Vast majority certainly are. And for those who excel, they would have no problem getting the certifications even if the bar were raised substantially.

    What Iím saying is they should make the degrees and certifications more difficult to get. That would force out the mediocre candidates, and the ones who arenít doing it because teaching is what they love. This would drive up wages for teachers like your wife.....

    I think everyone on this thread thinks Iím the bad guy because they arenít actually reading what Iím saying. Iím saying good teachers are victims of the lax requirements to be a teacher.....

  9. #39
    All-American waterboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saggy Aggie View Post
    I don’t think you understood the point of my post.

    I’m not saying all teachers aren’t capable of doing other jobs. Vast majority certainly are. And for those who excel, they would have no problem getting the certifications even if the bar were raised substantially.

    What I’m saying is they should make the degrees and certifications more difficult to get. That would force out the mediocre candidates, and the ones who aren’t doing it because teaching is what they love. This would drive up wages for teachers like your wife.....

    I think everyone on this thread thinks I’m the bad guy because they aren’t actually reading what I’m saying. I’m saying good teachers are victims of the lax requirements to be a teacher.....
    I understand what you're saying about incentives and making it tougher to become a teacher. I don't necessarily agree, though. I just take exception to the insinuation that people only take teacher jobs or nursing jobs because they weren't smart enough to do anything else. That may not have been the way you intended it, but that's the way it came across. That, and the "9 months a year" lie for teachers. My eldest daughter was valedictorian of her class, makes the President's list every semester in college, and yet she actually wants to become a teacher like her mother. She knows she won't get rich doing it but that is her chosen career path, and she will graduate in the spring. My youngest daughter was salutatorian (should have been valedictorian, but that's a whole other story) and has a 98 average in college right now. She has always wanted to be a registered nurse, and I know that she will be. She knows she faces extremely long hours, though the pay is good, but that is what she wants to do. They certainly have my blessing, though either of them are smart enough to be anything they want to be, including a doctor, engineer, accountant, etc.
    "Whatever It Takes"

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    P.R.I.D.E.

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    2004 3A - Division II
    2009 3A - Division I
    2014 4A - Division II

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saggy Aggie View Post
    Look, I agree teachers should be paid more because itís a tough job. But letís not pretend like theyíre grossly underpaid.

    Teachers work 9 months a year. They also have EVERY holiday off, they get a full week for thanksgiving and several weeks for Christmas. They have opportunities to earn extra pay by becoming department heads, master teachers, administrative positions, sponsoring programs at the school and/or coaching, tutoring, doing Saturday school, etc. Teachers also have an incredible retirement program that is sponsored by the state.

    When you look at their pay on an actual hours worked rate, itís not bad at all.

    Teaching degrees are also very easy to come by. My direct experience in school tells me that very few people start off going for a teaching degree. Majority of people I know who went for more challenging degrees and changed majors, changed to teaching.... thereís a ton of teachers. Itís also a supply and demand thing....

    Fire away
    I sure hope this is sarcasm.

  11. #41
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    No teacher works 9 months a year. None. I work from the beginning of August to the middle of June almost. I get a month and a half off. No, wait, I don't because I have professional development workshops I go to through out the summer.

    Yes, I knew what I was signing up for when I began teaching 18 years ago, and I can't see myself doing anything else, but don't think that teachers have it easy with our "three" months off during the summer and our 4 weeks we have off for various holidays and such.

    I work in a small district, and my pay is not even what you quoted above, but again that was my choice to work here because of the lack of stress from working in a huge district.

  12. #42
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    OH MY JEEZ. I started trying to read through all this and just gave up.
    Originally posted by Ranger Mom
    Umm...what is a sweet beaver??
    the best kind???

  13. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by panther89 View Post
    No teacher works 9 months a year. None. I work from the beginning of August to the middle of June almost. I get a month and a half off. No, wait, I don't because I have professional development workshops I go to through out the summer.

    Yes, I knew what I was signing up for when I began teaching 18 years ago, and I can't see myself doing anything else, but don't think that teachers have it easy with our "three" months off during the summer and our 4 weeks we have off for various holidays and such.

    I work in a small district, and my pay is not even what you quoted above, but again that was my choice to work here because of the lack of stress from working in a huge district.
    Again, Iím not a teacher so my perspective is probably skewed... but my best friend is a teacher and he gets his summers off mostly. Sure there is a week or so that he has things he needs to do, but he again gets paid extra to attend those conferences. If he chooses to work the summer, he gets paid. Maybe thatís not the case for all of you.

    Maybe youíre not off the full 3 months, but there is substantial time off.

    Your regularly scheduled hours are no different than the rest of us who put in extra time every week. I find it very disingenuous for you all to pretend like you work long hours every single week.

    Somebody else on this thread just tried to tell me their wife worked until 10pm 5 days in a row and then on Saturday. That may be the case once, but thatís not every week. Weíve ALL had weeks like that, if not worse.

    I worked 56 hours just last week, and then worked 4 hours Saturday and 6 hours Sunday, and I got into the office at 4:30am this morning - granted I have a big deliverable this week. Thatís not every week.

    I have worked 112 hour work weeks offshore before and plenty of 80+ hour weeks offshore and in Louisiana. I have worked until 2 am to submit deliverables. To me the ď12 months worth of work in 9 monthsĒ is BS.

    Sorry, maybe itís just me but I have 0 sympathy for crying about working long hours. Apparently no one else works long hours at work. Maybe the rest of the world works 8-5 M-F

  14. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by waterboy View Post
    I understand what you're saying about incentives and making it tougher to become a teacher. I don't necessarily agree, though. I just take exception to the insinuation that people only take teacher jobs or nursing jobs because they weren't smart enough to do anything else. That may not have been the way you intended it, but that's the way it came across. That, and the "9 months a year" lie for teachers. My eldest daughter was valedictorian of her class, makes the President's list every semester in college, and yet she actually wants to become a teacher like her mother. She knows she won't get rich doing it but that is her chosen career path, and she will graduate in the spring. My youngest daughter was salutatorian (should have been valedictorian, but that's a whole other story) and has a 98 average in college right now. She has always wanted to be a registered nurse, and I know that she will be. She knows she faces extremely long hours, though the pay is good, but that is what she wants to do. They certainly have my blessing, though either of them are smart enough to be anything they want to be, including a doctor, engineer, accountant, etc.
    I guess Iíll have to say it again but nowhere did I say that people ONLY take teaching jobs because theyíre easier to get. I said SOME do that and it hurts those who do teach because they love teaching. Facts are facts any way you slice it

    A portion of people do not reflect the overall teaching community

  15. #45
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    .............. at any rate,many if not most coaches,are over paid regardless of the type of contract or what teachers make.


    Stink on stink , low man wins = Ricebird football.

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